Rural News Delivery: September 7, 2005

We're pleased to offer you this compilation of articles that appeared in the national media this week on the subject of rural.

The information from these weekly updates is to be used for educational purposes only. Recipients may not repurpose the contents without permission from the source. Please note that links to newspapers may require registration. Thank you!

If you would like to receive the full copy of an article, please email your request to Shawn Poynter at memsvcs@ruralstrategies.org.

New York Times (New York, NY), Sept. 7, 2005
Urban evacuees find themselves among rural mountains
by Kirk Johnson

Lovers of the rural life in the Ozark Mountains of northwestern Arkansas would no doubt appreciate Baptist Vista Encampment, a rustic summer retreat on a long, winding dirt road here. But for the 150 hurricane evacuees who arrived just before dark on Monday, having been told almost nothing about where they were going or how long they would stay, the emotions were more complicated. Read the story.


photo by Spencer Tirey

Tuscaloosa News (Tuscaloosa, AL), Sept. 6, 2005
Evacuees to move from rural to urban areas for jobs
by James Jefferson - Associated Press

As thousands of Hurricane Katrina evacuees get their bearings at intermediate stops in Arkansas, many will be moved from rural settings into urban centers where jobs and schools are more readily available, Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Tuesday. "That's part of the plan, to create a place for all these folks, because we have so many," the governor said. "Then, as we get them placed, we'll start from the outer portions of the state and the more rural areas where we have camps and try to move them closer to urban areas." Arkansas expects to receive between 70,000 and 100,000 evacuees from the storm-ravaged Gulf Coast. Read the story.

Oxfam America (Boston, MA), Sept. 4, 2005
Oxfam partners assess Katrina's impact on rural communities
by Staff

In the days following the widespread destruction, damage in the rural regions of Louisiana and Mississippi has yet to draw national sympathy-and shock-the way the devastation in coastal areas and urban centers has. With trees down, power out, and communication between some parishes virtually impossible, no one knows the full extent of losses faced by farming and fishing communities. But Lorna Bourg, executive director of the Southern Mutual Help Association, has a plan that will help them. "If I had my druthers, we would be able to create a $10 million rural recovery fund," she said. "Five million of it would be used for direct emergency livelihoods recovery grants and that could be mixed with $5 million in a permanent loan pool." Read the story.

Washington Post (Washington, DC), Sept. 5, 2005
A four-legged drive to help rural readers
by Monte Reel

Each weekend, Luis Soriano and two heavily burdened donkeys traverse the hills and savannas of northern Colombia, where villages like El Dificil and El Tormento were aptly named for their rutted, tortuous approaches. Soriano's mission is quixotic, and the donkeys' cargo is precious: crates filled with as many as 160 books, destined for isolated villages where local residents have virtually no access to literature, beyond a few dog-eared elementary school texts and Bibles. For five years, the bookmobile, which Soriano calls "biblio-burros," has served as the only library in the remote and impoverished area. "People around here love stories," said Soriano, 32, a former shopkeeper from this village in the state of Magdalena. "I'm trying to keep that spirit alive in my own way." Read the story.


photo by Monte Reel

Wall Street Journal (New York, NY), Sept. 7, 2005
As Japan votes, aid to countryside hangs in balance
by Sebastian Moffett and Ginny Parker Woods

Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi is looking to engineer a shift no other Japanese leader has ever dared. His goal: To cut off the decades-long tradition of propping up Japan's declining countryside, and channel resources into the nation's successful cities and industries instead. To achieve that vision, Mr. Koizumi plans to dismantle the post office, which in addition to selling stamps also acts as a bank and insurer. It is a vast network with $3 trillion in savings and life-insurance deposits. The deposits are typically funneled into public-spending projects that have been a boon to rural villages. Read the story.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation Releases the 2005 KIDS COUNT Data Book

KIDS COUNT, a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, released the 2005 KIDS COUNT Data Book on July 27, 2005. The Data book features 10 key measures of child well-being that it has used to track the well-being of children since 1990. The data is used to provide state profiles of child well-being and to rank the states. This edition also includes several background measures related to unemployed parents in each state. The book also includes an essay by Casey President Douglas W. Nelson, "Helping Our Most Vulnerable Families Overcome Barriers to Work and Achieve Financial Success." The new report may be viewed online at www.kidscount.org. Also, free copies may be ordered on the web site or by phoning Casey publications at 410-223-2890.

The KIDS COUNT website provides users with lots of state-level statistical data on children and provides easy-to-use tools which allow users to generate custom reports including rankings, graphs, and maps, which can be downloaded. Raw data files are also available.

Institute for Rural Journalism

For more rural news, visit the web log of the the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, based at the University of Kentucky.


Sep. 27, 2005

Most Popular Resources

Template for Strategic Communications Plan

This template will help you to create a strategic communications plan. Print it off and fill it in as you work with your team on developing your organization's plan.

Jan. 26, 2006

W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide

Nonprofits today are being pressed to demonstrate the effectiveness of their program activities by initiating and completing outcome-oriented evaluation of projects. This guide was developed to provide practical assistance to nonprofits engaged in this process. In the pages of this guide, we hope to give staff of nonprofits and community members alike sufficient orientation to the underlying principles of "logic modeling" to use this tool to enhance their program planning, implementation, and dissemination activities.


Feb. 2, 2006

W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Handbook

This handbook provides a framework for thinking about evaluation as a relevant and useful program tool. It was written primarily for project directors who have direct responsibility for the ongoing evaluation of W.K. Kellogg Foundation-funded projects.

Jan. 1, 2010

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