Emmett & Trayvon

Separated by a thousand miles, two state borders, and nearly six decades, two young African Americans, Emmett Till and Trayvon Martin, met tragic fates that seem remarkably similar today: both walked into a small market to buy some candy; both ended up dead. Both murders also rocked our nation’s core and prompted several questions about racial tension and progress.

In an article for the January/February issue of Washington Monthly, Elijah Anderson, William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Sociology at Yale University, dives into the striking similarities between the two murders and questions our nation’s progress on race over the last 60 years.

Read the full article, as well as other articles from the January/February issue of Washington Monthly. In conjunction with the release of this special issue of Washington Monthly, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and Washington Monthly hosted an event in Washington D.C. on Jan. 25. Watch the C-SPAN coverage of the panel discussion.

Related Topics

News, Racial Equity

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